Ikebanart, the Revival of an Ancient Floral Art

Ikebanart, the Revival of an Ancient Floral Art

Opposite the Canal Saint-Martin lies a place of serene nature and exotic originality. Welcome to the jungle of Ikebanart, where floral artists Eugenie Myosotis and Gwenaël Jore are offering their alternate vision of flower assembly. Ficus, bromelia and cacti all defy weightlessness in expressive arrangements, suspensions and terrariums. Applying heritage techniques to contemporary design, the union of West and East is encompassed within the graceful lines, inspiring colours and refined shapes.

Ikebanart, the Revival of an Ancient Floral Art
Ikebanart, the Revival of an Ancient Floral Art
Ikebanart, the Revival of an Ancient Floral Art
Ikebanart, the Revival of an Ancient Floral Art

What is Ikebana ?

Eugénie

Ikebana is the ancestral Japanese art form of flower arrangement and composition. The name Ikebana derives from ikeru (to live) and bana (the flower). It is a mixture of sculpture and drawings. We work on sketches and vision before approaching any assembly. The desire is for the flower to be a focal point and play on its purity and valuation of each component. This gives a very delicate clarity to an ephemeral piece.

 

How did it all begin?

Eugénie

It all started in Switzerland when I met an old Japanese lady and she introduced me to Ikebana. I knew nothing at the time about flowers and it was the approach that captured me. It wasn’t just arranging flowers it was an art form, it was so interesting to me and quickly became a passion of mine. I then studied for 7 years to become a master ikebana. It required a lot of patience; a lot of Japanese arts are this way.

Gwenaël

Then, four years ago when Eugenie first told me about his art, I was interested immediately and we embarked on this adventure together. We went to an artist residency for a year and then worked on command, custom pieces and particular events. We had an order for 300 pieces for the Fnac Festival and realised we had outgrew our room (it was a jungle) and finally found the space we have now. It is a former garage and it’s become a store and studio space for us.

What is special about your work?

Eugénie

Besides our ikebana creations, we specialise in kokedamas. They are spheres surrounded by moss on which the plant grows. They too originate from Japan but the appearance is more modern. In technical terms, it’s halfway between a bonsai and ikebana. We also do plant installations, custom designs, hairpieces and object manipulation.

Gwenaël

In addition to that we offer introductory workshops on Ikebana. We are always looking to embrace obscurity and seeking unusual forms, the stranger and funnier the better! I really enjoy unusual plants; some even grow without roots, like Tillandsias for example… We have so much variety and plants are here to be enjoyed so let’s!

Ikebanart, 49 rue Lucien Sampaix, Paris 10ème.

www.ikebanart.com

Ikebanart, the Revival of an Ancient Floral Art
Ikebanart, the Revival of an Ancient Floral Art
Ikebanart, the Revival of an Ancient Floral Art Ikebanart, the Revival of an Ancient Floral Art Ikebanart, the Revival of an Ancient Floral Art Ikebanart, the Revival of an Ancient Floral Art Ikebanart, the Revival of an Ancient Floral Art
Ikebanart, the Revival of an Ancient Floral Art

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